SPAY/NEUTER  INFO




On the positive side, neutering male dogs
• eliminates the small risk (probably <1%) of dying from testicular cancer
• reduces the risk of non-cancerous prostate disorders
• reduces the risk of perianal fistulas
• may possibly reduce the risk of diabetes (data inconclusive)
On the negative side, neutering male dogs
• if done before 1 year of age, significantly increases the risk of osteosarcoma (bone cancer); this is a
common cancer in medium/large and larger breeds with a poor prognosis.
• increases the risk of cardiac hemangiosarcoma by a factor of 1.6
• triples the risk of hypothyroidism
• increases the risk of progressive geriatric cognitive impairment
• triples the risk of obesity, a common health problem in dogs with many associated health problems
• quadruples the small risk (<0.6%) of prostate cancer
• doubles the small risk (<1%) of urinary tract cancers
• increases the risk of orthopedic disorders
• increases the risk of adverse reactions to vaccinations

For female dogs, the situation is more complex. The number of health benefits associated with spaying may
exceed the associated health problems in some (not all) cases. On balance, whether spaying improves the
odds of overall good health or degrades them probably depends on the age of the female dog and the
relative risk of various diseases in the different breeds.
On the positive side, spaying female dogs
• if done before 2.5 years of age, greatly reduces the risk of mammary tumors, the most common
malignant tumors in female dogs
• nearly eliminates the risk of pyometra, which otherwise would affect about 23% of intact female
dogs; pyometra kills about 1% of intact female dogs
• reduces the risk in 4-20% of female dogs
• increases the risk of persistent or recurring urinary tract infections by a factor of 3-4
• increases the risk of recessed vulva, vaginal dermatitis, and vaginitis, especially for female dogs
spayed before puberty
• doubles the small risk (<1%) of urinary tract tumors
• increases the risk of orthopedic disorders
• increases the risk of adverse reactions to vaccinations perianal fistulas
• removes the very small risk (0.5%) from uterine, cervical, and ovarian tumors
On the negative side, spaying female dogs
• if done before 1 year of age, significantly increases the risk of osteosarcoma (bone cancer); this is a
common cancer in larger breeds with a poor prognosis
• increases the risk of splenic hem angiosarcoma by a factor of 2.2 and cardiac hem angiosarcoma by
a factor of >5; this is a common cancer and major cause of death in some breeds
• triples the risk of hypothyroidism
• increases the risk of obesity by a factor of 1.6-2, a common health problem in dogs with many
associated health problems
• causes urinary “spay incontinence”

In Conclusion,.basically, neutering before maturity causes the long bones to grow beyond the length they were meant to… and grow much lighter and weaker, so no… it does NOT stunt their growth… many times in fact, it actually makes them grow TALLER… but disproportionately and unhealthily… creating a heavy dog atop a very lanky and weak set of legs.




https://www.facebook.com/VetTechLife/photos/a.10150168125580062.420356.373382215061/10154898225585062/?type=1
 
 

Surgery Guidelines for Great Danes

The following information regarding both routine spay and neuter surgery as well as emergency situations in the Great Dane (such as those involving C-sections) is presented as a basic protocol to help avoid complications such as DIC (Disseminated Intravascular Coagulopathy) which appear to occur in a higher number of giant dogs undergoing surgery than the norm. Therefore, the GDCA offers the following information for owners and breeders of Great Danes.

Several veterinary clinics with regular and extensive experience dealing with giant breeds have developed similar protocols for surgery that can be recommended preferentially for giant breeds. These are techniques that have proven highly successful; both in routine spay/neuter surgeries as well as more critical care situations, such as C-sections. Such a set of protocols is offered below. We suggest you download it and discuss this with your veterinarian PRIOR to any surgical appointment.

Please review the following with your attending veterinarian before deciding to have surgery done on your Dane:

1. First find a veterinarian experienced with surgeries involving giant breeds.

2. All elective surgeries, such as spay/neuter, should be done ideally only on healthy animals. Spays are best planned in anestrous: about 3 months after the last season. Please insure your veterinarian is aware of any health concerns you might have about your dog prior to surgery.

3. Prior to any surgery, request that the veterinarian do a complete physical examination, including a good heart auscultation, and EKG.

4. Ensure that you elect to have the pre-surgical blood work done (CBC and serum chemistry panel) and ask them to also include a CLOTTING PROFILE.

5. If all blood work and the exam are normal, then schedule the surgery and fast the dog overnight. It's not generally necessary to withhold water for 12 hours (simply put the water bowl away at bedtime).

6. Ask that the surgeon insert an IV catheter prior to surgery. Fluid therapy should generally be administered as a safety precaution. Pulse oximetry and cardiac monitoring are also recommended. If blood pressure monitoring is available, consider any extra costs as potentially insuring additional safety margins.

7. Spay surgery in conjunction with C-section is not always the safest option in giant dogs. Be sure to discuss the pros and cons of two separate surgeries vs. doing both procedures at once with your veterinarian.

8. Currently, the induction agent, Propofol (deprivan), and the gas anesthesia, Sevoflurane, are considered the most ideal (safe and effective) anesthetic agents. These agents are not always available and always cost more to use. Valium, ketamine, and the gas isoflurane are widely available and generally acceptable. Due to the variations in physiology in giant breeds, drugs such as acepromazine, rompun and the thiopentals are less appropriate choices. Discuss this with your veterinarian. Also discuss appropriate pain control for your dog when contemplating surgery for your Great Dane.

9. During and after surgery, dogs are highly susceptible to hypothermia (lowered body temperature). The body loses heat directly through the surgical opening; stress and anesthetic agents further impair ability to maintain body temperature. Hypothermia adversely affects the cardiovascular system, coagulation, anesthesia recovery time and increases the risk of wound infection. Preventive measures, including warming of IV fluids, placing the dog on a heated pad (circulating water heating pad or other heating pad set on “low”) and covering the body and extremities with warmed blankets, towels, bubble wrap, or other protective coverings post-surgery are vital in conserving body heat. Temperature monitoring, either via electronic device or rectal thermometer, should be done during surgery and periodically throughout recovery.


Prepared by the Health and Welfare committee of the Great Dane Club of America. Written by Sue Cates, RVT and reviewed by LeAnn Lake-Heidke, DVM.


http://www.gdca.org/health/GreatDane%20705.pdf

YOUR PUPPY SHOULD NOT BE KEPT ON SOLID CONCRETE, TILE OR WOODEN FLOORS WHERE THERE IS NO SURFACE

TEXTURE FOR THEM TO GRIP WITH THEIR TOES, AND USE THEIR MUSCLES, LIGAMENTS AND TENDONS PROPERLY.

REMEMBER THE FRONT END OF A DOG SUPPORTS THE BODY WEIGHT, THE REAR PROPELS THE MOTION, SO THE FRONT
 
END MUST HAVE TRACTION.

SLICK SURFACES ALONG WITH LACK OF EXERCISE AND NUTRITIONAL MONITORING, WILL CONTRIBUTE TO "BOWING IN" AND

"KNUCKLING OVER" ON YOUR PUPPIE'S FRONT END ASSEMBLY.

WHILE YOUR DOG IS IN THE EARLY STAGES OF DEVELOPMENT (UNDER 6 MONTHS), IT IS BEST TO PURCHASE RUBBER-BACKED
 
THROW RUGS (NO FRINGE AND NO CONTINUOUS LOOP CARPETING, IN CASE THE CHEW IT), SO THEY HAVE SOMETHING TO GRIP
 
WHEN WALKING AROUND, AND YOU CAN WASH THEM WHEN NEEDED.
          





BLOAT INFO= GO TO     www.canadasguidetodogs.com  THEN  CLICK ON  HEALTH & NUTRITION
















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