The Great Dane has all the virtues of man with out the vices. ( quote: Lord Byron)

About Us

Hello, my name is Linda . I am originally from England.I breed and train T.B. horses, and blue Great Danes And have a small hobby farm located in Nova Scotia ,Canada .I am a Great Dane breeder who specializes in blues.. .I have imported a European blue bitch for my foundation.She is now a CKC Champion.Finishing her championship,at 19 months of age, with a group 3, Something no other natural eared blue Dane has done in Canada .Libby was also owner handled.I started breeding Danes 30 years ago , but have been away from ,it for a while. My goal is to produce long lived ,structurally sound,sane healthy Danes.Each litter is carefully planned,with bitch and sire complimenting one another.  Constantly striving to produce that near perfect Dane , who has a commanding presence and long low ground covering movement,that so many lack these days!! If a Dane cannot move correctly.it's conformation is flawed,and will not be used in my breeding program!!!! My Danes are pets first living in the house,not a kennel, show dogs second! All breeding stock will have passed all health clearance's,prior to being bred.I am primly breeding for the show ring,but also invite pet home inquiries. Great Dane puppies available occasionally .

Backyard Breeders

REMEMBER  . FAILURE TO TEST/SEARCH FOR INHERITABLE HEALTH PROBLEMS IS THE NUMBER ONE MARK OF
 A BACKYARD BREEDER. IT IS ALSO THE MOST DAMAGING TO CANINES, AND THE MOST HEARTBREAKING TO
PUPPY-BUYERS, WHO END UP WITH YET ANOTHER GENERATION OF POOR-QUALITY DOGS WHO TOO OFTEN
DEVELOP EXPENSIVE, EARLY HEALTH PROBLEMS AND OFTEN DIE PREMATURELY.


It is illegal in Canada to sell a dog as a purebred without supplying registration papers. All dogs born on Canadian soil
must be registered with its OFFICIAL REGISTRY - This is LAW and protected by the ANIMAL PEDIGREE ACT and anyone
Selling without papers can face criminal charges.

Breeding Principles






20 Principles of Breeding Better Dogs
by Raymond H. Oppenheimer



1. Remember that the animals you select for breeding today will have an impact
on the breed for many years to come. Keep that thought firmly in mind when you
choose breeding stock.

2. You can choose only two individuals per generation. Choose only the best,
because you will have to wait for another generation to improve what you start
with. Breed only if you expect the progeny to be better than both parents.

3. You cannot expect statistical predictions to hold true in a small number of
animals (as in one litter of puppies). Statistics only apply to large
populations.

4. A pedigree is a tool to help you learn the good and bad attributes that your
dog is likely to exhibit or reproduce. A pedigree is only as good as the dog it
represents.

5. Breed for a total dog, not just one or two characteristics. Don't follow fads
in your breed, because they are usually meant to emphasize one or two features
of the dog at the expense of the soundness and function of the whole.

6. Quality does not mean quantity. Quality is produced by careful study, having
a good mental picture of what you are trying to achieve, having patience to wait
until the right breeding stock is available and to evaluate what you have
already produced, and above all, having a breeding plan that is at least three
generations ahead of the breeding you do today.

7. Remember that skeletal defects are the most difficult to change.

8. Don't bother with a good dog that cannot produce well. Enjoy him (or her) for
the beauty that he represents but don't use him in a breeding program.

9. Use out-crosses very sparingly. For each desirable characteristic you
acquire, you will get many bad traits that you will have to eliminate in
succeeding generations.

10. Inbreeding is a valuable tool, being the fastest method to set good
characteristics and type. It brings to light hidden traits that need to be
eliminated from the breed.

11. Breeding does not "create" anything. What you get is what was there to begin
with. It may have been hidden for many generations, but it was there.

12. Discard the old cliché about the littermate of that great producer being
just as good to breed to. Littermates seldom have the same genetic make-up.

13. Be honest with yourself. There are no perfect dogs (or bitches) nor are
there perfect producers. You cannot do a competent job of breeding if you cannot
recognize the faults and virtues of the dogs you plan to breed.

14. Hereditary traits are inherited equally from both parents. Do not expect to
solve all of your problems in one generation.

15. If the worst puppy in your last litter is no better than the worst puppy in
your first litter, you are not making progress. Your last litter should be your
last litter.

16. If the best puppy in your last litter is no better than the best puppy in
your first litter, you are not making progress. Your last litter should be your
last litter.

17. Do not choose a breeding animal by either the best or the worst that he (or
she) has produced. Evaluate the total get by the attributes of the majority.

18. Keep in mind that quality is a combination of soundness and function. It is
not merely the lack of faults, but the positive presence of virtues. It is the
whole dog that counts.

19. Don't allow personal feelings to influence your choice of breeding stock.
The right dog for your breeding program is the right dog, whoever owns it. Don't
ever decry a good dog; they are too rare and wonderful to be demeaned by
pettiness.

20. Don't be satisfied with anything but the best. The second best is never good
enough.

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I used to look at [my dog] Smokey and think, 'If you were a little smarter you could tell me what you were thinking,' and he'd look at me like he was saying, 'If you were a little smarter, I wouldn't have to.'" - Fred Jungclaus
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